Plantar Fasciitis

Plantar Fasciitis:

Inflammation of the thick pad of tissue running from the heel to the toes on the underside of a person’s foot.

“Dr. Davis’ expert advice and the use of TESS allowed me to finally find relief from the regular pain that I had been experiencing due to plantar fasciitis! I felt less tight and an abatement of plantar fasciitis pain after following the recommended stretching routine with TESS. Thanks to Dr. Davis and his TESS device I was able to return to my active lifestyle!”

 

Heidi Moccia
Former NCAA Division I women’s soccer First Team All-American
Former Professional Soccer player

Plantar Fasciitis

Plantar Fasciitis:

Inflammation of the thick pad of tissue running from the heel to the toes on the underside of a person’s foot.

Dr. Davis’ expert advice and the use of TESS allowed me to finally find relief from the regular pain that I had been experiencing due to plantar fasciitis! I felt less tight and an abatement of plantar fasciitis pain after following the recommended stretching routine with TESS. Thanks to Dr. Davis and his TESS device I was able to return to my active lifestyle!

 

Heidi Moccia
Former NCAA Division I women’s soccer First Team All-American
Former Professional Soccer player

Symptoms

Plantar fasciitis is typically described as a sharp pain on the underside of the foot, typically occurring closer to the heel or in the arch of the foot. Most patients report that it is worse in the mornings or after long periods of rest.

symptoms

High Risk Factors

  • Walking and standing a lot
  • Athletic activity
  • Running
  • Wearing high heels
  • Weight lifting
  • Poor biomechanics 
  • Obesity
  • Over 40 years of age
  • Low or flat arches in your feet
  • Tight calf muscles

Two million people every year suffer from plantar fasciitis.

It can be a debilitating injury impeding someone’s ability to walk and resulting in loss of quality of life and productivity. It is caused when a person overexerts or stresses the fascia, which is a thick pad of tissue on the underside of your foot. The inflammation of this thick pad of tissue is diagnosed as plantar fasciitis.  

For such a common injury, it has been treated in the same fashion for decades. For a very long time, there have been few medical advancements in the treatments of plantar fasciitis up until TESS.

Traditionally, plantar fasciitis has been treated with a heel-cord box or night splints. The problem with these modes of treatment is that they allow the body to be completely out of balance when in use. They are meant to stretch out the muscles connected to the fascia to remove some of the tension that causes much of the injury’s pain. The problem is that they don’t work very well. When one uses night splints or a heel cord box to try and relieve some of that tension they are largely wasting their time. Optimal stretching only occurs when the body is in its natural posture, called sagittal balance. Standing on a heel cord box in the middle of a room or rolling around in a night splint in bed allows the body to constantly compensate for the attempt to stretch and mitigates most of the positive effects you might have experienced. TESS forces you into perfect posture, giving your legs a longer lasting stretch that provides lasting relief from plantar fasciitis. 

Interesting Facts

  • Plantar fasciitis is also known as Policeman’s Heel. Because police walk so much they commonly develop this kind of injury, which inspired the nickname.
  • It is almost always experienced in one foot at a time. Rarely does anyone have this same injury in both feet.
  • As recently as 40 years ago, an accepted treatment was to drill holes in the calcaneus bone.
  • There have been no advances in the treatment of this injury for decades.
  • Runners, hikers, walkers, and anyone who stands for a living are disproportionately affected.
  • 10% of all running related injuries are reported to be plantar fasciitis.
  • Recurrence is common, suggesting that the injury not only requires treatment but also some kind of lifestyle change.
  • 2 million people experience plantar fasciitis every year.